Throughout her novel, Maggie Atwood invokes a terrifying image of a society which includes completely corrected all it is ideologies and principles and named this The Republic of Gliead. In this culture Ofrred's only purpose in life is to reproduce for the elite, and failure to comply can lead to expulsion towards the colonies. The colonies will be places separated from contemporary society where sterile women are sent. The modern society of Atwood is defined in the dust of a broken America. In Gilead, ladies are entirely dominated simply by men and their position in society is totally determined by the status with their husband and their fertility. Atwood depicts women as incapable beings in a society totally unfamiliar to anything we might understand. In her new, the author offers more than just a critique of feminism since the issue of feminism is imbued into her work.

In Gilead, females are strictly categorized because Handmaids, Girlfriends or wives, Marthas, Econowives or Aunts. Offred can be described as Handmaid because she demonstrated her male fertility in pre-Gilead society by having a little girl. Wives will be women wedded to Commanders, men with a superior get ranking in world. Despite their particular elevated status, they have don’t have much power. Infertile spouses are given Handmaids who have sex with their husbands to be able to give labor and birth. Marthas are servants of Commanders and Econowives are those wedded to common men. Aunts are more mature, infertile ladies, dedicated to the regime, who train Handmaids. By referring to women as their category and never their individual name, Atwood impersonalises these women, making them represent their particular whole category within Gilead. This makes the novel more than just a fictional life, in fact it is research of women all together in certain circumstances.

Before Gilead was created, Offred, the leading part, was a usual woman. The girl had a task, was hitched to Henry, a man to whom she was very much in love with and had a daughter. A brilliant women, who was simply well educated and had gone to...